Archive for the ‘Audio Video’ Category

The De-Classic

Speaking of the rich artistic traditions of India, any Indian should be rather puffed up by pride. There are two streams of classical music in India with their divergent schools, viz. Carnatic and Hindustani. The former has moorings in South India and the latter has strong Persian influences and was immortalized by the court-musicians of the Mughal emperors. Elaborate ramifications of music have made any attempt to study classical music a herculean task and many do not have the calling. It calls for a quasi ascetic pursuit of the discipline.  Similarly, the Indian classical dances are Bharathanatyam, Kuchipudi, Mohiniyattam, Odissi and Kathak. There are many more dance forms which require elaborate erudition and systematic practice.

The rise of classical art forms are strongly linked to a culture of leisure. The discipline that leads to erudition and aesthetic sharpening basically springs from the fact that you have enough time and means to pursue your taste. In a land where the majority are underprivileged and ahs minimal exposure to the comforts of life , there can only be a spontaneous expression of the élan and not a systematic exposition. Nowadays, the interest for folklore are on the rise. Kudos to those who dare to see.

This occurred strongly to me as I was watching my friends of Veo ( an interior hill country of Arunachal Pradesh in India, the foothills of Himalayas, where the various hill tribe Nyishi inhabits) rehearsing a welcome dance. The dance steps all looked the same to me, but not without a definitive charm. They had nuances which I was not able to appreciate. These ladies were home after a backbreaking day of hauling sacks of grain from their fields to their granaries uphill, which indeed was after long spells of harvesting when they bend over with scythes. They lacked everything which could appeal to a Classical afficianados. I wonder how the steps exactly followed the lead, something very remarkable in what I thought to be an impromptu situation. Perhaps music is too rooted in their veins.

If you are more interested, this is a sampling of the bihu celebration by the Nocte tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

Drumming on tabletops and for that reason, on any hard surface of wood have been my occupation since child hood and it has tempered my hands a lot. I presume that this is the way they teach the traditional drum known as Mridanga in the Carnatic musical tradition of South India. So as a drummer I am as confident as any amateur can be. The best way to learn drumming is to teach the rhythm to your fingers so that they fall in the right place in the nick of the moment. Here listen to samples of the popular Indian rhythms sounded on a computer table top.

“Four Four”, the complete, typically western rhythm

“Three Four”: The rhythm of Waltz

“Four Eight:, the rhythm that rocks

“Five Eight”, the typically Indian, sways to the Cosmic Dance

“Six Eight”, the rustic dance rhythm, common to various folk music and ethnic and tribal music in India, it appears to be a very natural rhythm…

“Six Four”, the dirge

“Nine Eight”, typical celebration music, to the sound of large kettle drums

“Seven Eight”, the prayerful rhythm

 

percussively yours…